★★★★★ Presidential Dollars of 2009 ★★★★★

Obverse & Edge-Incused Inscriptions

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Presidential $1 coin Edge Presidential $1 coin Reverse

Edge and Obverse of
Presidential Dollars

Presidential Dollar Specs.
Obverse Designer: Don Everhart
Content: 88.5% copper, 6% zinc
Weight: 8.1 grams
Diameter: 26.5 millimeters
Edge: Lettered

The edge-incused inscriptions found on the four 2009 Presidential $1 Coins William H. Harrison, John Tyler, James K. Polk and Zachary Taylor include the year of minting or issuance (2009), E PLURIBUS UNUM, IN GOD WE TRUST and the mint mark (P, D or S).

Beginning in 2009 with the William Henry Harrison Presidential $1 Coin, the inscription IN GOD WE TRUST was moved to the coin's obverse (heads side), with the year of minting or issuance, E PLURIBUS UNUM and the mint mark remaining as edge lettering.

2009 Presidential $1 Coin Obverse Lady Liberty (Statue of Liberty)

On October 28, 1886, President Grover Cleveland accepted the Statue of Liberty on behalf of the United States and said, in part, "We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home; nor shall her chosen altar be neglected."

She is the work of sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, who enlisted the assistance of engineer Alexandre Gustave Eiffel, designer of the Eiffel Tower, to help him solve some of the structural challenges presented by creating a statue of such magnitude.

The Statue of Liberty was completed in 1884 and shipped to the United States in June 1885, having been disassembled into 350 individual pieces that were packed in over 200 crates for the transatlantic voyage. In four months' time, she was re-assembled in New York Harbor, standing just over 151 feet from the top of the statue's base to the tip of the torch her right hand holds high above the waters of New York Harbor.

Originally intended as a gift to celebrate the American Centennial in 1876, the Statue of Liberty was given to the United States as a symbol of the friendship forged between the new American government and the government of France during the American Revolutionary War.

The tablet she holds in her left hand carries the inscription "July IV MDCCLXXVI" in reference to the July 4, 1776, signing of the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the Nation.

For millions of Americans, the Statue of Liberty was the first sight that their ancestors saw as they arrived in America after having left their homes in search of a better life for themselves and for their families.

William Henry Harrison Presidential $1 Coin

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William Henry Harrison presidential dollar coin Obverse

9th President
1841

The fifth U.S. President to hail from Virginia, William Henry Harrison was born in 1773. When he was a small child, his father, Benjamin Harrison, signed the American Declaration of Independence. During a distinguished Army career, Harrison served as secretary of the Northwest Territory and governor of the Indiana Territory. He gained national fame and the nickname "Old Tippecanoe" from victories at the Battle of Tippecanoe and the Battle of the Thames against American Indians led by Shawnee chief Tecumseh.

Date/MintCirculation Strikes
William Henry Harrison
2009 P43,260,000
2009 D55,160,000
Reverse DesignerJoseph Menna

Harrison served in the Ohio State Senate, as a U.S. Representative and Senator from Ohio, and as U.S. minister to Colombia. In 1840, the Whig party tapped Harrison to run against incumbent President Martin Van Buren, who had become unpopular because of a lingering economic depression. "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too" (John Tyler was the vice presidential candidate) became the first and still one of the most memorable of presidential campaign slogans. Harrison defeated Van Buren in a landslide. At 68, Harrison was the oldest president to have served in the office up until that time.

In a bracing March rainstorm, Harrison gave the longest inaugural speech in U.S. history, lasting an hour and 45 minutes. Wearing neither hat nor coat, he caught a severe cold from the long exposure to the elements. Shortly thereafter, he developed pneumonia. He died exactly one month after his inauguration, becoming the first president to die in office.

Harrison's grandson, Benjamin Harrison, later became the 23rd President of the United States.

John Tyler Presidential $1 Coin

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John Tyler presidential dollar coin Obverse

10th President
1841 - 1845

Born in 1790 to a prominent Virginia planter family, John Tyler was a lawyer by training. He served as a Virginia state delegate and governor, U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator and vice president for one month under William Henry Harrison.

Date/MintCirculation Strikes
John Tyler
2009 P43,540,000
2009 D43,540,000
Reverse DesignerPhebe Hemphill

Tyler became the first vice president to take office upon the death of the sitting president. At that time, the U.S. Constitution was not clear on succession, and his entire presidency was dominated by questions on the scope of his Presidential powers, earning him the nickname "His Accidency." While many believed he should be recognized only as an acting president with limited powers, Tyler set an important precedent by assuming all the duties and powers of an elected president.

His independent streak caused him to lose favor with his political party, the Whigs, and practically his entire cabinet resigned in protest over his veto of a national bank bill. He championed the cause of Texas statehood, a controversial proposition at the time. After much political wrangling, he signed the bill annexing Texas just three days before leaving office after his defeat in the election of 1844. He retired to his Virginia home, Sherwood Forest, named to reflect his political "outlaw" status. He died in Richmond, Virginia, in 1862.

James K. Polk Presidential $1 Coin

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James K Polk presidential dollar coin Obverse

11th President
1845 - 1849

James K. Polk, America's 11th President, was born in 1795 in North Carolina. When he was a young boy, his family moved to the wilderness of Tennessee to establish a plantation there. Trained as a lawyer, he served 6 terms in the U.S. House of Representatives, including 4 years as Speaker of the House. After leaving the House, he served as Tennessee governor.

Date MintCirculation Strikes
James K. Polk
2009 P46,620,000
2009 D41,720,000
Reverse DesignerSusan Gamble

Despite his many years of national service, he was relatively unknown when he was nominated by the Democratic Party to run for President. He was the first "dark-horse" candidate to be nominated by a major political party and won the presidency by a slim margin over Henry Clay.

Polk was a strong proponent of "Manifest Destiny," the belief that the United States had the right to expand throughout the entire continent. He oversaw the growth of the country by more than 1 million square miles during his time in office, including the annexation of present-day Oregon and Washington from Great Britain. Through war with Mexico and the subsequent Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, California and New Mexico were added, and a Texas border on the Rio Grande was established.

A hard worker who rarely delegated even minor tasks, he hardly took a day of vacation while President. Having pledged to serve just 1 term, he left office exhausted from the strains of the presidency. He died in Nashville, Tenn., in 1849, just 3 and a half months after leaving office.

Zachary Taylor Presidential $1 Coin

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Zachary Taylor presidential dollar coin Obverse

12th President
1849 - 1850

Zachary Taylor, twelfth U.S. President, was born in 1784 in Virginia. His family moved shortly after his birth to a plantation outside Louisville, Kentucky, where he spent his childhood. His long Army career began at the age of 23 and for the next 30 years, he served in many remote outposts that stretched from Louisiana to northern Wisconsin. He led his forces to decisive victories in the Mexican-American War, which earned him the nickname "Old Rough and Ready".

Date MintCirculation Strikes
Zachary Taylor
2009 P41,580,000
2009 D36,680,000
Reverse DesignerDon Everhart

His reputation as a national hero made him an attractive presidential candidate, and he won the general election in a three-candidate race. Although he had little prior political experience, Taylor proved to be independent-minded, to the dismay of his political party, the Whigs. As the debate over slavery in western territories threatened to tear the country apart, he was determined that the Union be preserved at all costs. He warned southern leaders that he would command the Army himself, if necessary, to enforce the law.

Taylor became ill after attending a long ceremony at the Washington Monument on a scorching 4th of July in 1850. He died five days later, having served only 16 months in office. He was the second president to die in office.