1999 State Quarters

State Quarters
Obverse

Washington Bust State Quarter coin Obverse
State Quarter Specifications
Cladding Contentcopper/nickel
Core Content 100% copper
Weight 5.7 grams
Edge Reeded
Diameter 24.3 mm
Obverse DesignerJohn Flanagan

The State Quarter program began with passage on October 20, 1996 of the United States Commemorative Quarter Act, a program intended to recognizing each of the fifty states with its own circulating quarter. An independent study encouraged Congress to proceed with the program and a green light was given to this unprecedented coin series, and President Clinton signed it into law.

Under this program, each state was to be celebrated with its own unique reverse design on the Washington Quarter. The quarters obverse was to remained essentially the same, however, some of the statutory inscriptions were relocated to the obverse to make room for the new commemorative reverse design. It's uncertain if the regular Washington type, and the heraldic eagle reverse, will ever return.

The modified obverse bears the initials of both the original sculptor, John Flanagan (JF) and the U. S. Mint sculptor/engraver responsible for revising it, William Cousins (WC).

Delaware State Quarter

Delaware State Quarter coin Reverse

Delaware

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Delaware
1999 P 373,400,000
1999 D 401,424,000
Reverse Designer William Cousins

The Delaware quarter shows Patriot Caesar Rodney on his 1776 historic ride. Rodney made the 80-mile ride through terrible heat and thunderstorms to cast his vote in favor of Delaware signing the Declaration of Independence. Rodney's vote turned out to be the tie-breaker.

In 1787, 11 years after Caesar Rodney's historic ride, Delaware voted unanimously to ratify the United States Constitution. It was the first state to do so. Five years later, in 1792, Delaware adopted a new state constitution and changed its name from Delaware State to the State of Delaware.





Pennsylvania State Quarter

Pennsylvania State Quarter coin Reverse

Pennsylvania

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Pennsylvania
1999 P 349,000,000
1999 D 358,332,000
Reverse Designer John Mercanti

The Pennsylvania Quarter is the second quarter among the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. Above is the reverse of the coin. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, The Pennsylvania Quarter has a Commonwealth the statue which is atop the Pennsylvania capital dome, an outline of the state, the state motto and a keystone.

This design was chosen because it will educate people about the founding principles of Pennsylvania. Commonwealth is a bronze gilded 14-foot-six-inch high female form that has topped the capital dome since May 25, 1905.

The statue faces west, and balances on a gilt ball about 250 feet above street level. Her right arm extends in mercy; her left arm grasps a ribbon mace to symbolize justice. Commonwealth was designed by Roland Hinton Perry, a New York City sculptor. Perry designed her under commission as the symbolic embodiment of The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The actual statue is currently under restoration and will be returned to her place in September.


New Jersey State Quarter

New Jersey State Quarter coin Reverse

New Jersey

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
New Jersey
1999 P 363,200,000
1999 D 299,028,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer Alfred Maletsky

The New Jersey Quarter is the third quarter among the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, this design is a rendering of George Washington crossing the Delaware River.

The coin design is based on the 1851 painting by Emmanuel Leutze. It is a picture of Washington standing in his boat accompanied by members of the Colonial Army on the way to victories against the British at the battles of Trenton and Princeton.

The original painting is hung in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Underneath the picture on the coin the words, Crossroads of the Revolution are printed. The Commemorative Coin Design Commission selected the design by unanimous vote.


Georgia State Quarter

Georgia State Quarter coin Reverse

Georgia

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Georgia
1999 P 451,188,000
1999 D 488,744,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer T. James Ferrell

The Georgia Quarter is the fourth of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. Above is the reverse of the coin. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, the final design selection for the state of Georgia was made by the Governor and the Georgia Council for the Arts.

The design prominently features a Peach, a fruit long associated with the state, within the confines of a silhouette outline of the state. The central design is bordered in live oak sprigs, symbolic of the state tree. Draped across the top of the design is a banner bearing the state motto, Wisdom, Justice, Moderation.



Connecticut State Quarter

Connecticut State Quarter coin Reverse

Connecticut

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Connecticut
1999 P 688,744,000
1999 D 657,880,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer T. James Ferrell

The Connecticut Quarter is the fifth of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, on October 9, 1662, through the efforts of Governor John Winthrop, Saybook colony and New Haven colony united with Connecticut.

The British Charter he had won from King Charles II recognized the boundaries of Connecticut. This Charter also recognized Connecticut as a corporate state and agreed it would retain the system of government it had previously enjoyed.

As a result Connecticut had formed an independent, self reliant colonial government. During the night of October 31, 1687, the Connecticut Charter was put to a test. Sir Edmund Andros, a British representative for King James II, was executing a quo warranto, which challenged Connecticut's government structure and demanded the surrender of Connecticut's Charter.

In the middle of the heated discussion with the Charter on the table between the opposing parties, the candles were mysteriously snuffed out and after they were re-lighted, the Connecticut Charter was gone. A heroic Captain Joseph Wadsworth had saved it from the hands of the British and hid it in the safest place he could find. His choice was somewhere in a majestic white oak on the property of the Wyllys family. This famous tree finally fell during a great storm on August 21, 1856.

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