2001 State Quarters

State Quarters Obverse

Washington Bust State Quarter coin Obverse
State Quarter Specifications
Cladding Contentcopper/nickel
Core Content 100% copper
Weight 5.7 grams
Edge Reeded
Diameter 24.3 mm
Obverse DesignerJohn Flanagan

The State Quarter program began with passage on October 20, 1996 of the United States Commemorative Quarter Act, a program intended to recognizing each of the fifty states with its own circulating quarter. An independent study encouraged Congress to proceed with the program and a green light was given to this unprecedented coin series, and President Clinton signed it into law.

Under this program, each state was to be celebrated with its own unique reverse design on the Washington Quarter. The quarters obverse was to remained essentially the same, however, some of the statutory inscriptions were relocated to the obverse to make room for the new commemorative reverse design. It's uncertain if the regular Washington type, and the heraldic eagle reverse, will ever return.

The modified obverse bears the initials of both the original sculptor, John Flanagan (JF) and the U. S. Mint sculptor/engraver responsible for revising it, William Cousins (WC).

New York State Quarter

New York State Quarter coin Reverse

New York

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
New York
2001 P 655,400,000
2001 D 619,640,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer Alfred Maletsky

The New York Quarter is the eleventh of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, it features the Statue of Liberty superimposed over an outline of the state along with the inscription Gateway to Freedom.

Also incorporated into the state outline is a line tracing the Hudson River and the route of the Erie Canal.

This final New York design celebrates the Empire State as a point of entry for millions of immigrants seeking the political freedom and democracy that American citizenship provides. President Grover Cleveland accepted the Statue of Liberty, a gift from the people of France, on behalf of the United States on October 28, 1886.

Lady Liberty was designated a National Monument on October 15, 1924 and underwent extensive restoration for her remarkable centennial on July 4, 1986. Governor George E. Pataki asked the U.S. Mint to add the line tracing the Hudson River and the route of the Erie Canal because of the vital developmental role of the waterways.

North Carolina State Quarter

North Carolina State Quarter coin Reverse

North Carolina

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
North Carolina
2001 P 627,600,000
2001 D 427,876,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer John Mercanti

The North Carolina Quarter is the 12th of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, it highlights the aviation achievement of Orville and Wilbur Wright with a rendition of the famous 1903 photograph of the their accomplishment along with the inscription First Flight.

The North Carolina quarter commemorates the historic feat that took place on December 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina when Orville Wright piloted the first successful flight of a heavier-than-air, self-propelled flying machine. The craft, called the Flyer, traveled a distance of approximately 37 meters (120 feet) on its first flight and soared even further as one of the most significant human achievements in history.


Rhode Island State Quarter

Rhode Island State Quarter coin Reverse

Rhode Island

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Rhode Island
2001 P 423,000,000
2001 D 447,100,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer Thomas D. Rodgers

The Rhode Island Quarter is the thirteenth of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, it honors the Ocean State. Featuring a vintage sailboat gliding through Rhode Island’s famous Narragansett Bay, and an image of the Pell Bridge in the background, with the design showcasing Rhode Island's most popular sport-sailing.

With more than 400 miles of coastline, Rhode Island, the smallest state in the Union, has more than 100 fresh water and salt water beaches. Known as the sailing capital of the world, Rhode Island was home to the World Cup for more than 50 years. Narragansett Bay is crucial to the architecture of Rhode Island. An inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, extending into eastern Rhode Island, the Bay receives four major rivers, and has several islands.


Vermont State Quarter

Vermont State Quarter coin Reverse

Vermont

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Vermont
2001 P 423,400,000
2001 D 459,404,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer T. James Ferrell

The Vermont Quarter is the fourteenth of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, it features Camel's Hump Mountain with an image of maple trees being tapped for sugar in the forefront.

The design honors the Green Mountain State, the first state admitted to the Union after the original 13 colonies. Vermont is most famous for its skiing and the production of maple sugar and syrup. Until the 1800's when cane sugar was introduced, Americans relied on Vermont's maple sugar for much of its sugar supply.

Also featured on the quarter is Camel's Hump Mountain in the northern half of Vermont's Green Mountains. Camel's Hump is easily recognized by its unique double-humped profile and is one of the highest peaks in Vermont.

Kentucky State Quarter

Kentucky State Quarter coin Reverse

Kentucky

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Kentucky
2001 P 353,000,000
2001 D 370,564,000
Obverse Designer John Flanagan
Reverse Designer T. James Ferrell

The Kentucky Quarter is the fifteenth of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint. According to the U.S. Mint's official website, it shows a stately mansion on Federal Hill with an inscription that reads, My Old Kentucky Home. A thoroughbred racehorse is positioned behind a fence in the foreground of the quarter.

Kentucky was the first state on the western frontier to join the Union and is one of four states to call itself a commonwealth. Kentucky is home of the longest running annual horse race in the country, the Kentucky Derby.

The famous Kentucky Bluegrass country is also grazing ground for some of the world's finest race horses. Also featured on the new quarter is another prominent symbol of Kentucky, Federal Hill, which has become known as My Old Kentucky Home.

The design shows a side view of the famous Bardstown home where Stephen Foster wrote the state song, My Old Kentucky Home.

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