2004 State Quarters

State Quarters Obverse

Washington Bust State Quarter coin Obverse
State Quarter Specifications
Cladding Contentcopper/nickel
Core Content 100% copper
Weight 5.7 grams
Edge Reeded
Diameter 24.3 mm
Obverse DesignerJohn Flanagan

The State Quarter program began with passage on October 20, 1996 of the United States Commemorative Quarter Act, a program intended to recognizing each of the fifty states with its own circulating quarter. An independent study encouraged Congress to proceed with the program and a green light was given to this unprecedented coin series, and President Clinton signed it into law.

Under this program, each state was to be celebrated with its own unique reverse design on the Washington Quarter. The quarters obverse was to remained essentially the same, however, some of the statutory inscriptions were relocated to the obverse to make room for the new commemorative reverse design. It's uncertain if the regular Washington type, and the heraldic eagle reverse, will ever return.

The modified obverse bears the initials of both the original sculptor, John Flanagan (JF) and the U. S. Mint sculptor/engraver responsible for revising it, William Cousins (WC).

Michigan State Quarter

Michigan State Quater coin Reverse

Michigan

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Michigan
2004 P 233,800,000
2004 D 225,800,000
Reverse Designer Donna Weaver

The Michigan Quarter is the First of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2004, and the 26th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, much of Michigan's history is tied to the Great Lakes - Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario. These are five of the world's largest lakes that, together, encompass more than 38,000 square miles and form the largest body of fresh water in the world.

Michigan is the only State that borders four of the five Great Lakes, more than any other state. Standing anywhere in the State, a person is within 85 miles of one of the Great Lakes. To assist in navigating, Michigan has 116 lighthouses and navigational lights.

Florida State Quarter

Florida State Quarter coin Reverse

Florida

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Florida
2004 P 240,200,000
2004 D 241,600,000
Reverse Designer T. James Ferrell

The Florida Quarter is the Second of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2004, and the 27th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, the design incorporates a 16th century Spanish galleon, a space shuttle and the inscription Gateway to Discovery. A strip of land with Sabal palm trees is also depicted.

On Easter in 1513, while searching for the legendary Fountain of Youth, Ponce de Leon named the region Pascua Florida, meaning Flowery Easter. In 1539, Hernando de Soto and other explorers continued the exploration of the New World through the region.


Texas State Quarter

Texas State Quarter coin Reverse

Texas

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Texas
2004 P 278,800,000
2004 D 263,000,000
Reverse Designer Norman E. Nemeth

The Texas Quarter is the Third of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2004, and the 28th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, On December 29, 1845, Texas became the 28th state to be admitted into the Union. The quarter's reverse design incorporates an outline of the State with a star superimposed on the outline and the inscription, The Lone Star State. The lariat encircling the design is symbolic of the cattle and cowboy history of Texas, as well as the frontier spirit that tamed the land.



Iowa State Quarter

Iowa State Quarter coin Reverse

Iowa

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Iowa
2004 P 213,800.000
2004 D 251,800,000
Reverse Designer John Mercanti

The Iowa Quarter is the Fourth of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2004, and the 29th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, Iowa became the 29th state to be admitted into the Union. The Iowa quarter design features a one room schoolhouse with a teacher and students planting a tree, and the inscriptions Foundation in Education and Grant Wood. The design is based on Arbor Day, a painting by Grant Wood, who was born near Anamosa, Iowa. He spent his career as a proponent of small town values, which he celebrated in the iconic images of small town plain folk and verdant Midwestern vistas for which he is world-renowned.


Wisconsin State Quarter

Wisconsin State Quarter coin Type 1 Reverse

Wisconsin

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Wisconsin
2004 P 226,400,000
2004 D 226,800,000
Reverse Designer Alfred Maletsky

The Wisconsin Quarter is the Last of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2004, and the 30th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, Wisconsin became the 30th state to be admitted into the Union. The Wisconsin design depicts an agricultural theme featuring the head of a cow, a round of cheese and an ear of corn. The design also bears an inscription of the State motto, Forward.

There are three varieties of Wisconsin state quarters. The Type 1 is the most common, Types 2 and 3 are somewhat more rare. The difference is found in the lack of a lower leaf on the ear of corn on the Type 1 and the location of a lower leaf on the Type 2 and 3. The lower leaf is found only on the coins minted at the Denver Mint.

Click to view , & Wisconsin State Quarters Example
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