2006 State Quarters

State Quarters Obverse

Washington Bust State Quarter coin Obverse
State Quarter Specifications
Cladding Contentcopper/nickel
Core Content 100% copper
Weight 5.7 grams
Edge Reeded
Diameter 24.3 mm
Obverse DesignerJohn Flanagan

The State Quarter program began with passage on October 20, 1996 of the United States Commemorative Quarter Act, a program intended to recognizing each of the fifty states with its own circulating quarter. An independent study encouraged Congress to proceed with the program and a green light was given to this unprecedented coin series, and President Clinton signed it into law.

Under this program, each state was to be celebrated with its own unique reverse design on the Washington Quarter. The quarters obverse was to remained essentially the same, however, some of the statutory inscriptions were relocated to the obverse to make room for the new commemorative reverse design. It's uncertain if the regular Washington type, and the heraldic eagle reverse, will ever return.

The modified obverse bears the initials of both the original sculptor, John Flanagan (JF) and the U. S. Mint sculptor/engraver responsible for revising it, William Cousins (WC).

Nevada State Quarter

Nevada State Quarter coin Reverse

Nevada

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Nevada
2006 P 277,000,000
2006 D 312,800,000
Reverse Designer Don Everhart

The Nevada Quarter is the First of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2006, and the 36th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, Nevada, nicknamed The Silver State, was admitted into the Union on October 31, 1864, becoming our Nation's 36th state. Nevada's quarter depicts a trio of wild mustangs, the sun rising behind snow-capped mountains, bordered by sagebrush and a banner that reads The Silver State. The coin also bears the inscriptions Nevada and 1864.

Nevada is home to more than 50 percent of the Nation's wild horses. The wild horses dominate the Great Basin in the vast deserts and the more than 150 mountain ranges. The first mention of wild horses was discovered in several journals dating to the 1820s.

On behalf of Governor Kenny Guinn and State Treasurer Brian K. Krolicki, the Nevada State Quarter Commission accepted design concepts from the public in the summer of 2004. The 18-member Commission reviewed all submissions, and forwarded five recommendations to the United States Mint. The corresponding design images were created by United States Mint sculptor-engravers and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program. The citizens of Nevada voted on the designs. More than 60,000 votes were cast, and the people of Nevada favored the galloping horses design, The Silver State.

Nebraska State Quarter

Nebraska State Quarter coin Reverse

Nebraska

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Nebraska
2006 P 318,000,000
2006 D 276,400,000
Reverse Designer Richard Masters

The Nebraska Quarter is the Second of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2006, and the 37th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, Nebraska, nicknamed the Cornhusker State, was admitted into the Union on March 1, 1867, becoming our Nation's 37th state. Nebraska's quarter depicts an ox-drawn covered wagon carrying pioneers in the foreground and Chimney Rock, the natural wonder that rises from the valley of North Platte River, measuring 445 feet from base to tip. The sun is in full view behind the wagon. The coin also bears the inscriptions Nebraska, Chimney Rock and 1867.

Chimney Rock was designated a National Historic Site on August 9, 1956, and is maintained and operated by the Nebraska State Historical Society.

Practically anywhere travelers go in Nebraska they will encounter reminders of America’s westward expansion. The state is crisscrossed by the Oregon and Mormon Trails, the Pony Express, the Lewis and Clark Trail, the Texas-Ogallala Trail and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail.

Colorado State Quarter

Colorado State Quarter coin Reverse

Colorado

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Colorado
2006 P 274,800,000
2006 D 294,200,000
Reverse Designer Leonard Buckley

The Colorado Quarter is the Third of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2006, and the 38th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, The Colorado quarter depicts a sweeping view of the state's rugged Rocky Mountains with evergreen trees and a banner carrying the inscription Colorful Colorado. The coin also bears the inscriptions Colorado and 1876.

Colorado's Rocky Mountains are home to some of the Nation's most majestic natural wonders. Among these, rising approximately 10,000 feet from the valley floor in Northwest Colorado, Grand Mesa is the largest flat-top mountain in the world, and is home to more than 200 lakes and many miles of scenic hiking trails.

Colorado was admitted into the Union on August 1, 1876, becoming our Nation's 38th state. With statehood gained less than one month after the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Colorado is nicknamed the Centennial State.

North Dakota State Quarter

North Dakota State Quarter coin Reverse

North Dakota

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
North Dakota
2006 P 305,800,000
2006 D 359,000,000
Reverse Designer Stephen Clark

The North Dakota Quarter is the Fourth of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2006, and the 39th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, The North Dakota quarter depicts a pair of grazing American bison in the foreground with a sunset view of the rugged buttes and canyons that help define the State's Badlands region in the background. The coin's design also bears the inscriptions North Dakota and 1889.

The North Dakota Quarter Design Selection Process was launched by Governor John Hoeven on April 14, 2004, when the State’s nine-member commission was announced. Chaired by Lieutenant Governor Jack Dalrymple, the commission invited North Dakotans of all ages to submit narratives of 50 words or less. After reviewing thousands of suggestions, the commission recommended three narratives for design development: Agriculture, Landscape and Badlands. Candidate designs were developed by the sculptor-engravers of the United States Mint and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program and returned to North Dakota. On June 3, 2005, Governor Hoeven recommended the Badlands with Bison design for the North Dakota commemorative quarter-dollar.

South Dakota State Quarter

South Dakota State Quarter coin Reverse

South Dakota

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
South Dakota
2006 P 245,000,000
2006 D 265,800,000
Reverse Designer Michael Leidel

The South Dakota Quarter is the Last of the 50 States Commemorative Quarters released by the U.S. Mint in the year 2006, and the 40th of the entire series.

According to the U.S. Mint's official website, The South Dakota quarter features an image of the State bird, a Chinese ring-necked pheasant, in flight above a depiction of the Mount Rushmore National Monument, featuring the faces of four American Presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. The design is bordered by heads of wheat. The coin's design also bears the inscriptions South Dakota and 1889.

The South Dakota Quarter Advisory Committee began accepting ideas from the citizens of South Dakota via telephone, letters and e-mail. A group of five possible narratives was agreed upon and forwarded to the United States Mint for consideration. The final artistic renderings, developed by the sculptor-engravers of the United States Mint and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program, were returned to South Dakota, and a statewide vote was conducted. On April 27, 2005, South Dakota Governor M. Michael Rounds announced his recommendation of the Mount Rushmore and Pheasant design, echoing the choice of those who participated in the statewide vote.

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