pile of coins graphic TheCoinSpot.com logo

U.S. Twenty-Five Cent Coins


A twenty cent coin made sense with a decimal system of coinage, after all five coins would make a dollar. The denomination was first proposed by Thomas Jefferson in 1783. After much deliberation, Congress found more merit in the twenty-five cent coin which was approximately the same value as "two-bits" of the Spanish eight-reales coin (the eight-reales was the coin upon which the value of a dollar was set). Also, the eight-reales coin was widely used in the American colonies. The quarter dollar was authorized by the Mint Act of 1792. Because of the popularity of the Spanish Piece of Eight, the Quarter dollar would eventually become accepted throughout the world as the equal to "two bits" of the Spanish coin.

Today, most people fail to understand how seriously coinage was taken two hundred years ago. Most people of the day knew that a poorly designed coin would reflect poorly on the country. The opposite was also true, a handsomely designed coin of proper weight and fineness would be respected worldwide. This, in addition to the economic aspect, is why so much attention was given to gold and silver coins.



★★★★★ Draped Bust Quarter ★★★★★


Click to Enlarge
Small Eagle Draped Bust 25 cent coin (Type 1) Obverse Small Eagle Draped Bust 25 cent coin (Type 1) Reverse

Type 1 - Small Eagle
No Denomination

Click to Enlarge
Heraldic Eagle Draped Bust 25 cent coin (Type 2) Obverse Heraldic Eagle Draped Bust 25 cent coin (Type 2) Reverse

Type 2 Heraldic Eagle
w/Denomination

Like the first half dimes, the first quarter dollar design was the "Draped Bust" design, and it appeared without the denomination marked on it also. For the reverse, the small eagle design was used.

Early copper coinage had not been well received by the public, and the Flowing Hair design of the silver coins was also widely criticized. Thus, the design of the quarter dollar began with an almost universal dislike for the earlier coin designs. To avoid such public embarrassment with the new design, Mint Director Henry DeSaussure commissioned portrait artist Gilbert Stuart to develop a new design. Stuart, who supposedly used as his model the prominent Philadelphia socialite Mrs. William Bingham purposed what is now called the Draped Bust Design.

To the great disappointment of Stuart, transferring Mrs. Bingham's likeness into coined form was quite a flop. The rather bland portrait on the quarters did not resemble the beautiful sketches Stuart had made. This flop can be attributed to Robert Scot whom the Mint had hired as an engraver. Scot was a banknote plate artist and knew nothing about how to sink a die or make a device punch. With that in mind, the coins turned out better than would normally be expected. Stuart, for that reason, disavowed his connection with the design.

Many people described the Eagle on the reverse as "scrawny". There were also complaints regarding the lack of a denomination on the coin. This led to the revisions that created the Type 2 quarter dollar with the Stuart design.

Production only lasted one year, and when it resumed in 1804, the value 25 C. was included on the reverse below the new Heraldic Eagle's tail feathers.

In 1807, the Mint put the quarter back on the shelf. Because the Quarter contained more silver than the two-reales pieces (which was also legal tender) people preferred to spend the Spanish and Mexican two-reales coins and hoard the quarters with a higher silver content. The Quarter was not produced again until 1815, and then it came in a new design: John Reich's Capped Bust design.

     

Draped Bust Quarter Dollar Specs. & Mintage

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Type 1 Small Eagle
1796 only 6,146
Type 2 Large Eagle
1804 6,738
1805 121,394
1806 206,124
1807 220,643
Type 1 Small Eagle
Designer: Robert Scot
Weight: 6.74 grams
Diameter: 27.5 millimeters
Edge: Reeded
Content: 89% silver 11% copper
Mint Mark Location: NONE (All coins were minted in Philadelphia)

Type 2 Large Eagle
Designer: Robert Scot

Draped Bust (Small Eagle) Twenty Five Cent Grading

Select a grade image for comparison to your coin.

I View Grading
Grading Made Easy
@ TheCoinSpot.com

Wear first begins to shows on the hair above the forehead and on the hair over her ear and shoulder and on the area where the bust meets the drapery line. On the reverse, pay attention to the center of the eagle’s breast and the ribbon.

Draped Bust (Large Eagle) Twenty Five Cent Grading

Select a grade image for comparison to your coin.

I View Grading
Grading Made Easy
@ TheCoinSpot.com

Wear first begins to shows on the hair above the forehead and on the hair over her ear and shoulder and on the area where the bust meets the drapery line. On the reverse, pay attention to the center of the eagle’s breast and the ribbon.

Back to Top

Capped Bust Quarter 1815 - 1838

Click to Enlarge
Large Diameter Capped Bust 25 Cent Coin (Type 1) Obverse Large Diameter Capped Bust 25 Cent Coin (Type 1) Reverse

Type 1 Capped Bust
Large Diameter 1815 - 1828

Click to Enlarge
Small Diameter Capped Bust 25 Cent Coin (Type 2) Obverse Small Diameter Capped Bust 25 Cent Coin (Type 2) Reverse

Type 2 Capped Bust
Small Diameter 1831 - 1838

This coins designer, Reich, brought Europe to America. His obverse design shows Liberty facing left, surrounded by 13 stars, with the date below the bust. Liberty is quite buxom, and even though she was characterized in the press as the artist's fat mistress, she is probably representative of Europe in that period.

The reverse shows an eagle with outstretched wings perched on a branch and holding three arrows and the Union Shield on its breast. The motto E PLURIBUS UNUM can be seen on a scroll above the eagle.

The Type 1 Capped Bust quarter is often known as the Large Size. A more accurate designation would be the Open Collar type. They were struck without a restraining collar which gave them a broad, low-rimmed appearance and a slightly larger diameter. The type 1 is only larger in relation to its smaller successor the type 2, issued from 1831 onward. In reality, diameters vary widely over the years.

In 1829 several mechanical improvements were made to the presses used to strikes coins. It would not be, however, until 1831 these procedures could be used the production of quarter dollars. Mint Director Moore used these mechanical improvements to make several changes in the Capped Bust design.

Moore believed the motto, when translated to mean One made up from many meant the same as the legend UNITED STATES, and that was already on the coin. To be sure, the removal of the motto was controversial in government circles. Many officials wanted to keep it, but Moore went to Washington to make his case for its elimination. Moore prevailed, and the motto was not restored to quarters until 1892.

Tasked with the job, Kneass tightened the design as part of the changes and give the coin a more slender cameo-like appearance. He also deepened the dies, giving it better striking qualities. The higher beaded border around the rim served to protect the interior surfaces of the coin.

The quarter did not compete well with the Spanish 2 reales and the demand for quarters was limited. The Spanish 2 reales coins were legal tender (par with the heavier quarter), so the quarter coin was either hoarded or melted for its silver content.

There is also a mystery surrounding the Capped Bust quarter. There are pieces, mostly dated 1815 and 1825, that have a large "E" or "L" counter stamped above Liberty's head. Collectors in the 1870's thought they had official origins, possibly as some experiment, but official records have no mention of these pieces.

        

Capped Liberty Quarter Dollar
Type 1 Specs. Scroll On Reverse (1815-1828)
Designer: John Reich
Diameter: 29 millimeters
Content: 89% silver 11% copper
Weight: 6.74 grams
Edge: Reeded

Type 2 Specs. No Scroll On Reverse (1831-1838)
Designer: John Reich
Diameter: 27 millimeters

Type 3 - 1837-1838
Designer: William Kneass (Type 2 Modified)
Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
Content: 90% silver 10% copper
Weight: 6.7 grams
Capped Bust Quarter Dollar Mintage

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Type 1 Quarter
1815 89,235
1818 361,174
1819 144,000
1820 127,444
1821 216,851
1822 64,080
1823 17,800
1824
1825
168,000
1827 4,000
1828 102,000
Type 2 Quarter
1831 398,000
1832 320,000
1833 156,000
1834 286,000
1835 1,952,000
1836 472,000
1837 252,400
1838 366,000

Back to Top

Liberty Seated Quarter 1838 - 1891

Click to Enlarge
Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 1) Obverse Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 1) Reverse

Type 1 No Drapery
No Motto (1838-1839)

Click to Enlarge
Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 2) Obverse Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 2) Reverse

Type 2 Drapery No Motto
(1840-1853) (1856-1865)

The concept for the "Liberty Seated" design came from U.S. Mint Director Robert Patterson. Patterson liked the strength conveyed in the seated "Brittania" and ask for a design of his "Liberty Seated" concept. The design was placed on several coins, including the Quarter Dollar.

The obverse is a representation of Liberty with flowing robes, seated on a rock, her head turned to her right, her left arm bent and holding a pole topped by a "Liberty cap". Her right hand supporting a Union shield at her side across it is a curved banner displaying LIBERTY. The date is at the bottom of the rock on which she is setting. Inside dentils along the raised rim 13 stars form a partial circle.

In late 1840 modifications were made to the Liberty Seated design. Hughes added extra drapery at Liberty's left elbow and down over her knee. This earlier type does not have that drapery, so the lack of drapery became the identifier of the two types.

When Gold was discovered in California and began to be minted into coins, the price of silver went up compared to gold. From 1834 to 1850, the value of a silver dollar and a gold dollar nearly exactly the same. But, by 1851 the silver in four quarters was worth $1.035 in gold. By 1853 the value reached $1.06 in gold. Silver coins were rapidly taken out of circulation. Melting silver quarters and reselling them as bullion made a profit of 6%. Repeating this process was very profitable. As long as this condition existed, the hording and melting would continue. It is estimated that in 1850 and 1851 alone, over $25,000,000 in silver coins were exported.

Click to Enlarge
Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 3) Obverse Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 3) Reverse

Type 3 Arrows at Date
Rays on Reverse (1853)

Click to Enlarge
Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 4) Obverse Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 4) Reverse

Type 4 Arrows
w/o Rays (1854-1855)

To keep people from melting silver coins the silver content was dropped in silver coins (except for silver dollars). When the silver in the quarter dollar was reduced from 6.68 grams to 6.22 grams, an arrowhead was added to each side of the date, and rays extending out from the eagle were added to the reverse.

The next year, the rays were eliminated from the reverse. The reason for this change was most likely because of the extra time needed to make the dies with rays, also excessive die wear from the heavier pressure needed to strike the design properly.

Even though most collectors approach the Seated Liberty quarter as type collectors, some collectors still some still try to complete a date and mint mark collection. The toughest to find of the later dates in Mint State condition are the San Francisco coins from 1856-1865 and, to a lesser extent, the Philadelphia coins of 1863-1865. Type collectors often find the Philadelphia issues of 1857, 1858, 1861 and 1862 in their collection because they are most available when pursuing Liberty Seated quarters in gem condition.

Click to Enlarge
Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 5) Obverse Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 5) Reverse

Type 5 No Arrows
W/Motto on Reverse
(1866-1873) (1875-1891)

Click to Enlarge
Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 6) Obverse Liberty Seated 25 Cent Coin (Type 6) Reverse

Type 6 Arrows at Date
W/Motto on Reverse (1873-1874)

Keeping the lighter weight, the Type 2 design was resumed in 1856 and continued until 1865. In 1866 the motto IN GOD WE TRUST was added to the reverse.

After four very long years of civil war, the bitterness and hatred that divided the North and South turned to numbness and shock. 1861 to 1866 had seemed like an eternity. With an end came to the fighting, Americans came to the realization of how devastating the war had been. The United States would never be the same again, but it was now and forever would be a single Union. Many of the religious populace saw this sacrifices made on both sides by the dead and the living as divine judgment from above.

Turning to religion in their grief, Americans made religion their new priority. This was even reflected in their coinage. The new motto IN GOD WE TRUST first appeared on the new two-cent piece minted in 1864. It was so well received that on March 3, 1865, Congress mandated its use on all gold and silver coins when possible. The law was implemented in 1866 and seven other coins was adorned with this statement of faith including the Liberty Seated quarter dollar.

     

Liberty Seated Specs.


Without Motto On Reverse (1838-1853)
Obverse Designer 1838 - Early 1840: Thomas Sully
Reverse Designer 1838 - Early 1840: Christian Gobrecht
Obverse Designer Late 1840 - 1853: Thomas Sully (modified by Robert Ball Hughes)
Reverse Designer Late 1840 - 1853: Christian Gobrecht
Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
Content: 90% silver 10% copper
Weight: 6.68 grams
Edge: Reeded

Arrowheads At Date With Rays On Reverse (1853 Only)
Obverse Designer: Thomas Sully (modified by Christian Gobrecht and Robert Ball Hughes)
Designer: Reverse by Christian Gobrecht
Weight: 6.22 grams

Arrowheads At Date Without Rays On Reverse (1854-1855)
Obverse Designer: Thomas Sully (modified by Christian Gobrecht and Robert Ball Hughes)
Reverse Designer: Christian Gobrecht

Without Motto On Reverse (1856-1865)
Obverse Designer: Thomas Sully (modified by Christian Gobrecht and Robert Ball Hughes)
Reverse Designer: Christian Gobrecht

With Motto On Reverse (1866-1873)
Obverse Designer: by Thomas Sully (modified by Christian Gobrecht and Robert Ball Hughes)
Reverse Designer: by Christian Gobrecht (modified by James Barton Longacre)

Arrowheads At Date (1873-1874)
Obverse Designer: by Thomas Sully (modified by Christian Gobrecht and Robert Ball Hughes)
Reverse Designer: by Christian Gobrecht (modified by James Barton Longacre)
Weight: 6.25 grams

With Motto On Reverse (1875-1891)
Obverse Designer: by Thomas Sully (modified by Christian Gobrecht and Robert Ball Hughes)
Reverse Designer: by Christian Gobrecht (modified by James Barton Longacre)
Liberty Seated mintage


Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Type 1 Mintage
1838 466,000
1839 491,146
Type 2 Mintage
1840 188,127 1840-O 425,200
1841 120,000 1841-O 452,000
1842 88,000 1842-O 769,000
1843 645,600 1843-O 968,000
1844 421,200 1844-O 740,000
1845 922,000
1846 510,000
1847 734,000 1847-O 368,000
1848 146,000
1849 340,000 1849-O 412,000
1850 190,800 1850-O 0
1851 160,000 1851-O 88,000
1852 177,060 1852-O 96,000
1853 44,200
Type 3 Mintage
1853 15,210,020 1853-O 1,332,000
Type 4 Mintage
1854 12,380,000 1854-O 1,484,000
1855 2,857,000 1855-O 176,000 1855-S 396,400
Type 2 Resumed
1856 7,264,000 1856-O 968,000 1856-S 286,000
1857 9,644,000 1857-O 1,180,000 1857-S 82,000
1858 7,368,000 1858-O 520,000 1858-S 121,000
1859 1,343,200 1859-O 260,000 1859-S 80,000
1860 804,400 1860-O 388,000 1860-S 56,000
1861 4,853,600 1861-S 96,000
1862 932,000 1862-S 67,000
1863 191,600
1864 93,600 1864-S 20,000
1865 58,800 1865-S 41,000
Type 5 Mintage
1856 7,264,000 1856-O 968,000 1856-S 286,000
1857 9,644,000 1857-O 1,180,000 1857-S 82,000
1858 7,368,000 1858-O 520,000 1858-S 121,000
1859 1,343,200 1859-O 260,000 1859-S 80,000
1860 804,400 1860-O 388,000 1860-S 56,000
1861 4,853,600 1861-S 96,000
1862 932,000 1862-S 67,000
1863 191,600
1864 93,600 1864-S 20,000
1865 58,800 1865-S 41,000
1866 16,800 1866-S 28,000
1867 20,000 1867-S 48,000
1868 29,400 1868-S 96,000
1869 16,000 1869-S 76,000
1870 86,400 1870-CC 8,340
1871 118,200 1871-S 30,900 1871-CC 10,890
1872 182,000 1872-S 83,000 1872-CC 22,850
1873 212,000 1873-CC 4,000
Type 6 Mintage
1873 1,271,160 1873-S 156,000 1873-CC 12,462
1874 471,200 1874-S 392,000
Type 5 Mintage Resumed
1875 4,292,800 1875-S 680,000 1875-CC 140,000
1876 17,816,000 1876-S 8,596,000 1876-CC 4,944,000
1877 10,911,200 1877-S 8,996,000 1877-CC 4,192,000
1878 2,260,000 1878-S 140,000 1878-CC 996,000
1879 13,600
1880 13,600
1881 12,000
1882 15,200
1883 14,400
1884 8,000
1885 13,600
1886 5,000
1887 10,000
1888 10,000 1888-S 1,216,000
1889 12,000
1890 80,000
1891 3,920,000 1891-O 68,000 1891-S 2,216,000

Back to Top

Liberty Bust (aka "Barber") Quarter 1892 - 1916

Click to Enlarge
Liberty Bust 'BARBER' 25 Cent Coin Obverse Liberty Bust 'BARBER' 25 Cent Coin Reverse

Liberty Bust (Barber) Quarter

Like the Mercury dime, the Franklin half dollar, the Walking Liberty half dollar, the Lincoln cent and most other coins, the name we give to a coin is based upon the design rather than the designer. Normally, the designers initials on the coin, are the only reference to the designer’s identity. Only four U.S. coin designs are known by their designer’s names. The Gobrecht dollar and the Morgan dollar are two coins that are know for their beauty. The Augustus Saint-Guadens twenty dollar is a third that is know for its beauty, But, the Barber coins (dime, quarter and half dollar) are known as such because of the controversies of Barbers office.

When William Barber (chief mint engraver) died in 1879, his son Charles Barber was chosen by President Hayes to fill the position. In 1887, James P. Kimball noted in the Mint Directors annual report that, he believed, the coinage of the United States should be updated.

The Treasury Department, in spite of the advice of Charles Barber, organized a competition to produce a new design. Disaster was the obvious out come when they choose Barber, Augustus Saint-Gaudens and engraver Henry Mitchell to judge the contest. Each judge believed that he was a better designers than any of the contestants. In the end, Charles Barber, with the support of the new Mint Director Edward O. Leech, was chosen to do the design work which was what he had wanted all along.

Liberty's portrait facing right is similar to George Morgan’s design on the dollar. Around the Liberty cap is a laurel wreath tied by a bow. She has a small band in the front which displays the word LIBERTY. Inside the rim are the words IN GOD WE TRUST, the date at the bottom, with thirteen six-point stars, six to the left and seven to the right.

The reverse displays a eagle with outstretched wings and legs, the left claw clutching an olive branch and the right a bundle of arrows. The eagles beak holds a ribbon with E PLURIBUS UNUM on it. Around the rim are UNITED STATES OF AMERICA at the top QUARTER DOLLAR at the bottom. There are thirteen five-point stars above the eagle.

     

Liberty Bust Specs.


Designer: Charles E. Barber
Weight: 6.25 grams
Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
Edge: Reeded
Content: 90% silver 10% copper
Mint Mark Location: Below the eagle's tail on the reverse.
Liberty Bust Mintage


Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Three Mints in operation
1892 8,236,000 1892-O 2,640,000 1892-S 964,079
1893 5,444,023 1893-O 3,396,000 1893-S 1,454,535
1894 3,432,000 1894-O 2,852,000 1894-S 2,648,821
1895 4,440,000 1895-O 2,816,000 1895-S 1,764,681
1896 3,874,000 1896-O 1,484,000 1896-S 188,039
1897 8,140,000 1897-O 1,414,800 1897-S 542,229
1898 11,100,000 1898-O 1,868,000 1898-S 1,020,592
1899 12,624,000 1899-O 2,644,000 1899-S 708,000
1900 10,016,000 1900-O 3,416,000 1900-S 1,858,585
1901 8,892,000 1901-O 1,612,000 1901-S 72,664
1902 12,196,967 1902-O 4,748,000 1902-S 1,524,612
1903 9,669,309 1903-O 3,500,000 1903-S 1,036,000
1904 9,588,143 1904-O 2,456,000
1905 4,967,523 1905-O 1,230,000 1905-S 1,884,000
1906 3,655,760 1906-D 3,280,000 1906-O 2,056,000


Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Four Mints in operation
1907 7,192,000 1907-D 2,484,000 1907-O 4,560,000 1907-S 1,360,000
1908 4,232,000 1908-D 5,788,000 1908-O 6,244,000 1908-S 784,000
1909 9,268,000 1909-D 5,114,000 1909-O 712,000 1909-S 1,348,000


Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Three Mints in operation
1910 2,244,000 1910-D 1,500,000
1911 3,720,000 1911-D 933,600 1911-S 988,000
1912 4,400,000 1912-S 708,000
1913 484,000 1913-D 1,450,800 1913-S 40,000
1914 6,244,230 1914-D 3,046,000 1914-S 264,000
1915 3,480,000 1915-D 3,694,000 1915-S 704,000
1916 1,788,000 1916-D 6,540,800

Back to Top

Standing Liberty Quarter 1916 - 1930

Click to Enlarge
Standing Liberty 25 Cent Coin (Type 1) Obverse Standing Liberty 25 Cent Coin (Type 1) Reverse

Type 1 Liberty Standing
Bare Breast

Click to Enlarge
Standing Liberty 25 Cent Coin (Type 2) Obverse Standing Liberty 25 Cent Coin (Type 2) Reverse

Type 2 Covered Breast
Stars Below Eagle

By the year 1916, Charles Barber's uninspired design on the dime, quarter and Half dollar had been around 25 years. The Mint could not replace a coin design more frequently than every 25 years under an 1890 law. A misinterpretation of the this law caused Mint Director Robert W. Woolley to think he must replace the existing designs each 25 years of production. Therefore, he reasoned, it was time to change them. In spite of the major distraction of World War I raging in Europe, the public was ready for something different.

It was the perfect opportunity to issue a coin that, reflected the political climate in the United States which was at best guarded. The artist chosen for the new design was a prominent sculptor, Hermon Atkins MacNeil, who was known for his works dealing with Indians and American history. McNeil's design captured the guarded mood with a design that featured a standing frontal view of Liberty. The style was certainly reminiscent of the Greek style. Her left arm has a shield in a posture of protection, her right hand offers up an olive branch. It was a mixed message that told our European neighbors we were ready for war or peace.

Type 1 was issued for only two years, 1916-1917, as there was some concern over Liberty's bared breast. The model for Liberty on this quarter was likely a composite of silent film actor Dora Doscher and Broadway actress Irene MacDowell; MacDowell's husband disapproved of the pose, probably because of the partial nudity of Liberty (the undraped right breast).

In 1917, the design was modified, and the offending feature was from then on covered with chain mail.

Type 2 was substantially reworked, the most evident changes were the repositioning of the stars on the reverse along with the chain mail on Miss Liberty's breast.

Other smaller changes were a smoothing of the fields and a pronounced curvature to the dies. In 1925 the obverse underwent another minor change: The date area recess was increased to reduce wear of the date (it was one of the highest features and first to ware). Some say this constitutes a Type 3, others disagree.

Click to view 1918-S Quarter example.

Both Type 1 and Type 2 quarters were produced by all three mints during 1917.

     

Liberty Standing Specs.

Designer: Hermon MacNeil
Weight: 6.3 grams
Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
Edge: Reeded
Content: 90% silver 10% copper
Mint Mark Location: Above and to the left of the date on the obverse
Liberty Standing Mintage

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Date/Mint Circulation Strikes
Type 1 Bare Breast No Stars
1916 52,000
1917 8,740,000 1917-D 1,509,200 1917-S 1,952,000
Type 2 Covered Breast With Stars
1917 13,880,000 1917-D 6,224,400 1917-S 5,552,000
1918 14,240,000 1918-D 7,380,800 1918-S 11,072,000
1919 11,324,000 1919-D 1,944,000 1919-S 1,836,000
1920 27,860,000 1920-D 3,586,400 1920-S 6,380,000
1921 1,916,000
1923 9,716,000 1923-S 1,360,000
1924 10,920,000 1924-D 3,112,000 1924-S 2,860,000
1925 12,280,000
1926 11,316,000 1926-D 1,716,000 1926-S 2,700,000
1927 11,912,000 1927-D 976,000 1927-S 396,000
1928 6,336,000 1928-D 1,627,600 1928-S 2,644,000
1929 11,140,000 1929-D 1,358,000 1929-S 1,764,000
1930 5,632,000 1930-S 1,556,000

Liberty Standing Twenty Five Cent Grading

Select a grade image for comparison to your coin.

I View Grading
Grading Made Easy
@ TheCoinSpot.com

When grading this design inspect carefully Liberty’s right knee and the center of the shield. On the reverse, the eagle’s breast and left wing will first show wear.

full-head

To qualify as "full head", the coin must exhibit the following three features:

  1. three leaves in Liberty’s hair must be totally visible,
  2. Hair details well defined.
  3. the hairline along Liberty’s brow must be complete and Eyebrow visible.
  4. the ear indentation must be evident.
  5. Cheek is rounded

Coins graded “full head” are much scarcer than those without this feature fully struck, but this classification has more to do with the quality of the strike than with grade.

Back to Top

Washington Head Quarter 1932 - 1998

Click to Enlarge
Washington 25 cent coin (Type 1) Obverse Washington 25 cent coin (Type 1) Reverse

Type 1 Silver Quarter
(1932 - 1964)

Click to Enlarge
Washington 25 cent coin (Type 2) Obverse Washington 25 cent coin (Type 2) Reverse

Type 2 Clad Quarter
(1965-1974 / 1977-1998)

1932 would be the 200th anniversary of George Washington’s birth, and many officials in Washington D.C. wanted to mark the occasion. But, the economic depression, Soup kitchens, massive unemployment and the Dust Bowl seemed to offer Americans little reason to celebrate. The Treasury Department decided to continue a completion for a new Quarter Dollar design honoring President Washington.

The Commission of Fine Arts and the Washington Bicentennial Commission had little trouble deciding upon a design, however, Treasury Secretary Mellon refused to approve the design. Since changing the design of the half dollar required Congressional approval, Congress asked they instead decided to change the quarter. Thus, an end to the 1916 Standing Liberty design became certain.

Ultimately Mellon chose the Flanagan design. While still fielding protests from the advisory panel, he left office to become Herbert Hoover’s ambassador to Great Britain. His successor, Ogden Mills, would consider the matter no further and reminded the Commissioners they had a purely an advisory role and that the final decision was with the Treasury Secretary, not the Commission.

Click to Enlarge
Washington 25 cent coin (BiCentenial) Obverse Washington 25 cent coin (BiCentenial) Reverse

Type 3 BiCentenial Quarter
(1975 & 1976)

There were two significant changes in the series since it began in 1932 and before 1999 when the State Quarter series began.

In 1965 the metal content of the Washington quarter was changed. Type 2 production was began with a quarter with a copper center and a layer of silver on each side. The reeded edge revealed the copper interior instead of silver as in the past.

For obvious reasons, Americas 200th birthday was a cause for major celebration. In addition to the many parties and ceremonies that took place around the country and on radio and television, Americas coinage would also celebrate. The third modification to the Washington Quarter dollar came in 1975, when Jack Ahr's Bicentennial Drummer Boy design appeared on the reverse and the dual-date-1776-1976 was placed on the obverse. Mintage of this coin took place in both 1975 and 1976. In 1977, the regular Type 2 design returned.



     

Washington Bust Quarter Dollar Specs.


Type 1 - Eagle Reverse
Silver (1932-1964)
Designer: John Flanagan
Weight: 6.3 grams
Diameter: 24.3 millimeters
Edge: Reeded
Content: 90% silver 10% copper
Mint Mark: Below the wreath on the reverse

Type 2 Eagle Reverse
Clad (1965-1974, 1977-1999)
Weight: 88 grains (5.7 grams)
Outer Layers Content: 75% Copper, 25% Nickel
Center Layer Content: 100% Copper
Mint Mark 1965 - 1967: Below the wreath on the reverse
Mint Mark 1968 - 1999: Right of the ribbon on the obverse

Type 3 Bicentennial
Clad (1975 & 1976)
Reverse Designer: Jack L. Ahr

Note! Specifications for STATE, TERRITORIAL and AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL/ATB quarters are given with the images.

Date/Mint Circulation Strikes Year/Mint Circulation Strikes Year/Mint Circulation Strikes
Type 1 Washington Quarter
1932 5,404,000 1932-D 436,800 1932-S 408,000
1934 31,912,052 1934-D 3,527,200
1935 32,484,000 1935-D 5,780,000 1935-S 5,660,000
1936 41,300,000 1936-D 5,374,000 1936-S 3,828,000
1937 19,696,000 1937-D 7,189,600 1937-S 1,652,000
1938 9,472,000 1938-S 2,832,000
1939 33,540,000 1939-D 7,092,000 1939-S 2,628,000
1940 35,704,000 1940-D 2,797,600 1940-S 8,244,000
1941 79,032,000 1941-D 16,714,800 1941-S 16,080,000
1942 102,096,000 1942-D 17,487,200 1942-S 19,384,000
1943 99,700,000 1943-D 16,095,600 1943-S 21,700,000
1944 104,956,000 1944-D 14,600,800 1944-S 12,560,000
1945 74,372,000 1945-D 12,341,600 1945-S 17,004,001
1946 53,436,000 1946-D 9,072,800 1946-S 4,204,000
1947 22,556,000 1947-D 15,388,000 1947-S 5,532,000
1948 35,196,000 1948-D 16,766,800 1948-S 15,960,000
1949 9,312,000 1949-D 10,068,400
1950 24,920,126 1950-D 21,075,600 1950-S 10,284,004
1951 43,448,102 1951-D 35,354,800 1951-S 9,048,000
1952 38,780,093 1952-D 49,795,200 1952-S 13,707,800
1953 18,536,120 1953-D 56,112,400 1953-S 14,016,000
1954 54,412,203 1954-D 42,305,500 1954-S 11,834,722
1955 18,180,181 1955-D 3,182,400
1956 44,144,000 1956-D 32,334,500
1957 46,532,000 1957-D 77,924,160
1958 6,360,000 1958-D 78,124,900
1959 24,384,000 1959-D 62,054,232
1960 29,164,000 1960-D 63,000,324
1961 37,036,000 1961-D 83,656,928
1962 36,156,000 1962-D 127,554,756
1963 74,316,000 1963-D 135,288,184
1964 560,390,585 1964-D 704,135,528
Type 2 Clad Coins Begin
1965 1,819,717,540
1966 821,101,500
1967 1,524,031,848
1968 220,731,500 1968-D 101,534,000
1969 176,212,000 1969-D 114,372,000
1970 136,420,000 1970-D 417,341,364
1971 109,284,000 1971-D 258,634,428
1972 215,048,000 1972-D 311,067,732
1973 346,924,000 1973-D 232,977,400
1974 801,456,000 1974-D 353,160,300
Type 3 Bicentennial 1776-1976
1776-1976 809,784,016
Type 2 Clad Coins Resume
1977 468,556,000 1977-D 256,524,978
1978 521,452,000 1978-D 287,373,152
1979 518,708,000 1979-D 489,789,780
P Mark for Philadelphia begins
1980-P 635,832,000 1980-D 518,327,487
1981-P 601,716,000 1981-D 575,722,833
1982-P 500,931,000 1982-D 480,042,788
1983-P 673,535,000 1983-D 617,806,446
1984-P 676,545,000 1984-D 546,483,064
1985-P 775,818,962 1985-D 519,962,888
1986-P 551,199,333 1986-D 504,298,660
1987-P 582,499,481 1987-D 655,594,696
1988-P 562,052,000 1988-D 596,810,688
1989-P 512,868,000 1989-D 896,535,597
1990-P 613,792,000 1990-D 927,638,181
1991-P 570,968,000 1991-D 630,966,693
1992-P 384,764,000 1992-D 389,777,107
1993-P 639,276,000 1993-D 645,476,128
1994-P 825,600,000 1994-D 880,034,110
1995-P 1,004,336,000 1995-D 1,103,216,000
1996-P 925,040,000 1996-D 906,868,000
1997-P 595,740,000 1997-D 599,680,000
1998-P 960,400,000 1998-D 907,000,000
State Quarter Series Begins

Back to Top

★★★★★ State Quarters, Territorial Quarters
and America the Beautiful Quarters ★★★★★

When the 50-State Quarter Program began in 1999 the obverse design was altered slightly. The reason for this was to include some of the wording from the reverse. Certain things are required by law and cannot be omitted. The statutory legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the value QUARTER DOLLAR were relocated to the obverse to provide space for the distinctive reverses. However, the obverse is still the recognizable image of Americas first president.

The influx of fifty new and interesting designs on the reverse has brought new interest to coin collecting (probably no surprise to mint officers and officials). This apply's not only to quarters, but to all kinds of U. S. coins. A large number of Americans now save at least one example of each new design, and nearly as many try to assemble a full sets. Owing to the success of the program, a secondary program was established to extended coinage through 2009. Its purpose was to recognize The District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. To accomplish this, changes were made no less than five times per year through 2008, as each of the fifty states and territories are commemorated on the quarter's reverse.

The program was so wildly successful, it was decided to extend the program even farther honoring the national parks, forests, trails, drives, forts and historic locations. The current series of quarters is called America the Beautiful. The length of this program has not been disclosed at present. But, it is believed that another program, with some undisclosed motif, will likely follow the America the Beautiful series.

State Quarters
Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia & Connecticut
Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire & Virginia
New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont & Kentucky
Tennessee, Ohio, Louisiana, Indiana & Mississippi
Illinois, Alabama, Maine, Missouri & Arkansas
Michigan, Florida, Texas, Iowa & Wisconsin
California, Minnesota, Oregon, Kansas & West Virginia
Nevada, Nebraska, Colorado, North Dakota & South Dakota
Montana, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming & Utah
Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arizona, Alaska & Hawaii


Territorial Quarters  
District of Colombia, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, U.S. Virgin Islands & Northern Mariana Islands


America the Beautiful
Hot Springs, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Grand Canyon & Mt. Hood
Gettysburg, Glacier, Olympic, Vicksburg & Chickasaws
El Yunque, Chaco, Acadia, Volcanoes & Denali
Ft. McHenry, Great Basin, Mt. Rushmore, Perry's Victory & White Mountain
Arches, Everglades, Smoky Mountains, Sand Dunes & Shenandoah
Homestead, Kisatchie, Blue Ridge, Bombay Hook & Saratoga
Shawnee, Cumberland, Harpers Ferry, Roosevelt & Ft. Moultrie

Back to Top